Directories featuring Winteringham

Winteringham Local History and Genealogy

Directories

This page contains the text version of several directories.  For scans of the originals of most of these, please click here.  Note: the ‘unusual’ capitalisation, spellings, etc of the originals has been maintained in these documents.

White’s 1842

Winteringham, a long straggling village, on a bold declivity, on the south side of the Humber, 7½ miles W. of Barton, has now in its parish 691 inhabitants, and about 3050 acres of land.  Lord Carrington owns a great part of the soil, and is lord of the manor, which was anciently held by the Marmions, one of whom, in the reign of Edward II, obtained a charter for a market here, but it was discontinued several centuries ago.  A pleasure fair is held on July 14th.  The copyholds are subject to small certain fines.  In this parish, the great Roman road, Ermine Street, is continued across the broad channel of the Humber, by means of Brough ferry.  Stukeley says, "upon a rising ground, at the end of the road, a little to the right, and a half a mile to the east of Winteringham, stood the Roman town, Ad Abuta, of which the people have ploughed up great foundations within memory;  `tis now a common, skirted by the marshes of the Humber.  The city was ploughed up about six years ago (1700,) and great quantities of antiquities found, now lost; great pavements, chimney stones, &c., often breaking their ploughs.  In several they found streets made of sea sand and gravel.

The old haven mouth is called Flashmire, and is over against Brough, a Roman town, on the Yorkshire shore."  the flat, by the Humber, as well as the banks above it, affords a most agreeable promenade or drive, in which the broad bosom is seen laden with all sorts of craft, and giant steam is beheld triumphing over both land and water,- the Humber Packets and the trains of the Hull and Selby railway, on the opposite bank of the river, darting to and fro before the eye with the fleetness of wind; whilst, in the background, are seen many handsome villas, and the bold ranges of the Yorkshire Wolds.  Near the village, is a chalybeate spring, supposed to possess great medicinal properties.  The Church (All Saints) is a neat structure, of Early English architecture, lighted by lancet shaped windows, and consisting of a nave, with aisles, a chancel, a chapel on the north side, and a western tower.  The arches have zigzag and other mouldings, and in the chancel is a tomb, on which is laid the figure of a knight in armour, probably one of the Marmions.

The Rectory, valued in K.B. at £28, and now at £657, is in the gift of the Earl of Scarborough, and incumbency of the Rev. Fras. Swan, of Lincoln. At the enclosure, about 300 acres were awarded in lieu of tithes, the Independents, and the Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists, have each a chapel here, and there is a National School in the village. The poor parishioners have divided among them yearly, in money and coals, £13. 4s. 4d., arising from the bequest of the Rev. Thos. Adams (£100,) Eleanor Scarborough (£100 in 1815,) Roger Manners (£3.6s. 8d. per aim., left in 1596,) and Thomas Middleton. They have also £16 per annum, from a house and land, left by Thos. Boothby, in 1682, except four acres allotted at the enclosure. The Rev. Thos. Adams, who died in 1784, was rector here, and author of "Private Thoughts on Religion," &c. Henry Kirk White, the late youthful poet of Nottingham, was some time at school here. Mr. Burkill, a respectable corn merchant, on retiring from commercial pursuits, has recently been presented with a massive piece of plate, as a token of respect from the gentlemen with whom he had conducted business. White poppies are cultivated in this neighbourhood for distillation.

Directory of Residents
Barratt John, Bricklayer
Barratt John, Butcher
Bell Wm., Victualler, Bay Horse
Burkill Chas., Corn Mercht.
Burkill John and Isaac, Maltsters, and Corn and Coal Merchts.
James Ann, Victualler, Ferry House
Judge Charles, Corn Miller
Kendall William, Wheelwright
Marshall Wm., Butcher & Brickmkr.
Moxon Rev. Wm. Charles, Curate
Ogg Thomas, Victualler, Ship
Otter John, Bricklayer, &c.
Scarborough Mrs. Mary
Sergeant Sarah, Blacksmith
Spencer Isaac, Fellmonger
Suggett Jefferson, Gentleman
Waddingham Geo., Ship and Boat Builder
Waddingham John, Beerhouse
Walker John, Schoolmaster
Westoby John, Gentleman
Wigelsworth James, Blacksmith

Farmers
*are owners
Barratt Edward
Barratt Hardy
Barratt William
Brankley Robert
Brooks Samuel
*Burkill John
*Chapman Jph., Grange
Legard Joseph, Sluice
Robinson George

Whites 1856:

Barratt Mr John
Clark Mrs Hnh.
Beacock Joseph, coal merchant
Bell Wm. vict., Bay Horse
Bell Wm. ship & boat builder
Burkill Chas. 8c Isaac, maltsters, & corn & seed merchants
Burkill Isaac & Jph. wine & spirit merchants
Burkill Robt. earthenware dealer
Burkill Edmund, schoolmaster
Dent Chas. master mariner
Foster Mr. Jno.
Cordeaux Edm.
Jackson Charles, butcher
Judge Charles, corn miller
Kendall Wm. vict, Ferry House
Lord John, accountant
Marshall Wm. brick & tile maker
Otter John, mason & builder
Read Rev. Thos. Fredk. Rudston, M.A., rector, Rectory
Rose Robert, master mariner
Scarbrough Mr John, & Mrs My. Ann
Spencer Charles, blacksmith
Waddingham John, beerseller and ferryman, & Wm. master mariner
Warburton Wm. maltster
Westoby Mr John
Suggitt Mrs D,
Wigglesworth James, blacksmith
BOOT& SHOEMKS.
Booth Ward
Driffill Ralph
Pickersgill Wm.
Robinson Wm.
Slingsby Charles
FARMERS.
Barratt James
Barratt John
Brankley Robert
Burkill Edw.
Burkill Henry
Driffill Hy. M.
Hanson Gilbert, and butcher
Kirkby Sarah
Marshall Wm.
Scarbrough John
Sewell Barratt
Sewell James
Sewell John
Snowdon Robert
Sutton Wm.
Wharton David
JOINERS AND Wheelwrights
Reynolds Wm. & parish clerk
Sargeant John
Slingsby Cooper
Spencer Jabez
SHOPKEEPERS.
Barnett Hercules
Otter Hannah
Reynolds Wm, & parish clerk
Watkin John, & draper, &c.
TAILORS.
Jaques Henry
Obridge Wm.
Sargison Wm.
POST OFFICE at Hercules Barnett's.
POST via Brigg
CARRIERS to Barton & Hull Robinson Hy. Sewell James

Post Office Directory 1861
WINTERINGHAM is a parish and pleasant village, which formerly had a market, on the south bank of the Humber, 2 miles north of Winterton, and 7 miles west of Barton, in the northern division of the wapentake of Manley, Brigg union, diocese of Lincoln, archdeaconry of Stow, deanery of Manlake, parts of Lindsey, and Barton-upon- Humber county court district. The living is a rectory, value £657, with residence, in the gift of Emanuel College, Cambridge. The Rev. Thomas Frederick Rudston Read, M.A., is the incumbent. The church of All Saints is a neat building, in the Norman and Early English styles of architecture, consisting of nave, aisles, south porch and transept, and has a tower at the west end containing 5 bells, some of the windows are enriched with beautiful stained glass, by Wailes, of Newcastle. The old register dates from 1562. A pleasure fair is held here on the 14th of July The Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel. There is also a National school, erected in 1845. About half-a-mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities. The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of £13 4s. 4d., arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adams, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton. The population in 1851 was 824, with about 3,050 acres of land. Lord Carrington is the lord of the manor. On the river side are wharfs for corn, malt coal and timber. On the Humber the Hull and Gainsborough steamers run, and on the opposite shore is a station of the Hull and Selby railway, 
PRIVATE RESIDENTS.
Burkill Charles, esq
Burkill Isaac, esq
Burkill Joseph, esq
Cavill Mr. William
Chapman Mrs. J,
Clark Mrs. H,
Driffill Henry, esq
Naylor Mr. Charles
Read Rev. Thomas Frederick Rudston M.A. [rector]
Scarbrough John, esq
Scarbrough Miss M A
Suggitt Mrs. D
COMMERCIAL
Barnett Hercules, draper & grocer
Barratt James, farmer
Barratt John, bricklayer
Barratt John, farmer
Bell William, Bay Horse
Bell William, ship carpenter
Bickell Edward, National schoolmaster
Brattan William, boot & shoe maker
Brumby William, farmer
Burkill Charles & Isaac, corn merchants & maltsters
Burkill Edward, farmer
Reynolds William, carpenter, builder
Burkill Isaac & Joseph, wine & spirit merchants
Burkill Henry, farmer
Burkill Robert, earthenware dealer
Driffill Henry, farmer
Driffill Ralph, boot & shoe maker
Gibson Thomas, farmer
Handson Gilbert, butcher & farmer
Jackson Charles, butcher
Jaques Henry, tailor
Jillott John, wheelwright
Johnson Samuel, brick & tile maker
Judge Charles, miller, farmer & grocer
Kendall William, farmer
Kirkby Sarah (Mrs.), farmer
Lawtey Stephen, vessel owner
Leaberry Lawtey, farmer
Marshall William, farmer
Obridge William, tailor
Otter Hannah (Miss), draper & grocer
Otter John, bricklayer
Parker Henry, farmer
Parker William, Ferry House
Pearson Thomas, brick & tile maker
Pickersgill Benjamin, farmer
Pickersgill Francis, butcher
Pickersgill William, boot & shoe maker & grocer
Robinson Henry, carrier
Robinson John, farmer
Sargison William, tailor
Scarbrough John, farmer
Sergeant John, wheelwrights
Sewell Barratt, farmer
Sewell Charles, bricklayer
Sewell James, farmer
Sewell John, farmer
Slater John, brick & tile maker
Slingsby Charles, boot & shoe maker
Slinsby Cooper, wheelwright
Snowden Robert, farmer
Spencer Jabez & George, fellmongers
Storm John, farmer
Sutton William, farmer
Tupling Robert, tailor
Wadd William, blacksmith
Waddingham Ellen (Miss), day school
Waddingham John, beer retailer
Watkin John, draper & grocer
Waud Hannah (Mrs.), infant school
Wharton David, farmer
Wigelsworth James, blacksmith 
POST OFFICE Hercules Barnett, postmaster. Letters  through Brigg arrive 12 a.m.; dispatched 3.30 p.m. The nearest money order office is at Winterton. There is not a delivery or dispatch on Sundays
National School Edward Bickell, master
CARRIERS James Sewell, to Barton, monday; to Hull, tues. &friday Henry Robinson, to Barton, monday, to Hull, tuesday & friday
Two FERRY BOATS to Hull, on tuesday & friday

Post Office Directory 1868

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town, parish, and pleasant village, "which formerly had a market, on the south bank of the Humber, in the Northern division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Winterton, Glanford  Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow, and diocese of Lincoln, 2½ miles north from Winterton, and 7 west from Barton. The church of All Saints is a neat building, in the Norman and Early English styles of architecture, consisting of nave, aisles, south porch and transept, and has a tower at the west end containing 5 bells : some of the windows are of stained glass, by Wailes, of Newcastle: a small but good organ, by Foster and Andrews, of Hull, has been recently placed in the church. The register dates from the year 1561. The living is a rectory, annual value £700, with residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and held by the Rev. Charles Knowles, M.A.  of that college. There is a National school, erected in 1845. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel. A pleasure fair is held here on the 14th of July.

The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £12, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners, and Thomas Middleton, and a dole of Mr. Thomas Boothby's produces about £16 per annum. On the riverside are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber. On the Humber the Hull, Gains- borough, Goole and York steamers run, and on the opposite shore is a station of the Hull and Selby Railway. About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities. Lord Carington [sic], who is the lord of the manor, and the Rev,  Charles Knowles, M,A., owner of the glebe are the principal landowners. The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone strata, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface. The area is 3,979 acres of land, and 1,705 of water, principally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber, and the population in 1861 was 858.

Parish Clerk, William Reynolds.
POST OFFICE.-Edmund Bickell, postmaster.  Letters through Brigg, arrive at 10 a.m.; dispatched at 3.30 p.m.
The nearest money order office is at Winterton. There is not a delivery or dispatch on Sundays
National School, Edwin A. Cates, master

CARRIERS:
John Sewell, to Barton, monday; to Hull, tuesday & friday
Henry Robinson, to Barton, monday ; to Hull, tues, & fri

WATER CONVEYANCE.-Two ferry hoats principally for goods, to Hull, on tuesday & friday

Burkill Mrs
Burkill Isaac, esq
Cavill Mr. William
Chapman Miss
Clark Mrs. H
Driffill Henry, esq
Heseltine Mrs. Thomas
Knowles Rev, Charles, M.A., J.P.
[rector]
Naylor Mr. Charles
Scarbrough John, esq
Scarbrough Miss
Suggitt Mrs
Sutton Mr. William, sen
Towle Mr, George
COMMERCIAL.
Barr George, tailor
Barratt John, farmer
Bates Samuel, miller & grocer
Bell William, Bay Horse
Bickell Edmund, grocer & draper,& post office
Bromby Edward, potato dealer
Brumby William, farmer
Burkill Charles, farmer
Burkill Isaac & Joseph, merchants
Burkill Edward W. farmer
Burkill Henry (Mrs.), farmer
Burkill Robert, earthenware dealer
Burkill Robert, farmer
Button George- brick & tile maker
Driffill Henry, farmer
Driffill Ralph, boot & shoe maker
Gillott John, wheelwright
Handson Gilbert, butcher & farmer
Jackson Charles, butcher
Kendall Holland, farmer
Kirkby Sarah (Mrs.), farmer
Lawtey Stephen, vessel owner
Lord John, ship owner
Marshall William, farmer
Obridge [sic] William, tailor
Otter Hannah (Miss), draper & grocer
Otter John, bricklayer
Parker Henry, farmer
Pickersgill Benjamin, farmer
Pickersgill William, boot & shoe maker
Reynolds William, carpenter & grocer
Robinson Henry, carrier
Robinson Josiah, farmer
Scarbrough John, farmer
Sewell Barratt, farmer
Sewell Charles, bricklayer
Sewell James, farmer
Sewell John, farmer
Slater John, brick & tile maker
Slater John, Ferry House
Slingsby Charles, boot & shoe maker
Slingsby Cooper, wheelwright
Snowden Robert, farmer
Spencer Jabez, fellmonger
Sutton William, farmer
Wadd William, blacksmith
Waddingham Ellen (Miss), day school
Waddingham John, beer retailer
Watkin John, draper & grocer
Wharton David, farmer
Wiggelsworth James, blacksmith

White’s 1872

Winteringham, a long straggling village, on a bold acclivity, on the south side of the Humber, 7½ miles W. of Barton, and 2½ miles N. of Winterton, has now in its parish 779 inhabitants, and about 3970 acres of land.  Lord Carington [sic] owns most of the soil, and is lord of the manor, which was anciently held by the Marmions, one of whom, in the reign of Edward II., obtained a charter for a market here, but it was discontinued several centuries ago.  A pleasure fair is held on July 14th.  The copyholds are subject to small certain fines.  From this parish, the great Roman road, Ermine street, was continued across the broad channel of the Humber by means of Brough ferry, which has for some time been discontinued.  Stukely [sic] says, "Upon a rising ground, at the end of the road, a little to the right, and a half mile east of the present Winteringham, stood the Roman town, Ad Abum, of which the people have ploughed up great foundations within memory; 'tis now a common, skirted by the marshes of the Humber.  The city was ploughed up about six years ago (1700), and great quantities of antiquities found, now lost; great pavements, chimney stones, &c, often breaking their ploughs.  In several places they found streets made of seas sand and gravel.  The old haven mouth is called Flashmire, and is over against Brough, a Roman town, on the Yorkshire shore."  The flat, by the Humber, as well as the banks above it, affords a most agreeable promenade or drive, from which are seen the broad bosom of the estuary, laden with all sorts of craft, the Humber packets and the trains of the Hull and Selby railway, on the opposite side of the rover; and in the back-ground many handsome villas, and the bold ranges of the Yorkshire Wolds.  Near the village is a chalybeate spring, supposed to possess great medicinal properties.  The Church (All Saints) is a neat structure of late Norman and early English architecture, lighted by lancet shaped windows, and consisting of a nave, with aisles, a chancel, south transept and a western tower.  It was restored in 1851 at a cost of £1300.  The arches have zig-zag and other mouldings, and in the interior of the building is the figure of a knight in armour, probably one of the Marmions.  The church also contains an organ built by Messrs. Forster and Andrews of Hull, about seven years ago, and several windows of modern stained glass.  The rectory, valued in K.B. at £28, and now at £730, is in the patronage of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and incumbency of the Rev. Charles Knowles, M>A>, who has about 280 acres of glebe, and a good rectory house, built in 1847.  The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel here; there is a National School in the village, built in 1845.  A Library, containing over 200 volumes, with Reading Room, supplied with daily newspapers, magazines, &c., was established here in 1869, and of which the Vicar is president;  Mr Bickell, secretary; and Mr Henry Burkill, librarian.  The poor parishioners have divided among them yearly, in money and coals, £13. 4s. 4d., arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam (100), Eleanor Scarbrough (£100 in 1815)), Roger Manners (£3. 6s. 8d. per annum left in 1596) and Thomas Middleton.  They have also £16 per annum, from a house and land, left by Thomas Boothby, in 1682, except four acres allotted at the enclosure.  The Rev. Thomas Adam, who died in 1784, was rector here, and author of "Private Thoughts on Religion," &c.  Henry Kirke White, the youthful poet of Nottingham, was sometime at school here.

POST OFFICE at Mr. Edmund Bickell's.  Letters arrive at 10 a.m., and are despatched at 3.35 p.m. via Brigg.  Winterton is the nearest Money Order Office;  Appleby is the nearest Railway Station.

Barr George, tailor
Barratt Dearing, farmer
Barratt John, farmer
Bates Samuel, grocer & corn miller, Alexander mills
Beacock Matthew, coal merchant and ferry boat owner
Bell William, Victualler, Bay Horse, and ship carpenter.
Bickell Edmund, grocer, draper and postmaster
Brattan [sic] John William, shoemaker
Bray Edwin, manager
Bromby, Edward, farmer and potato dealer
Brumby John, farm bailiff
Brumby William, farmer
Burkill Charles, farmer
Burkill Edward William, farmer, Manor house
Burkill Henry, farmer
Burkill Isaac, maltster (I. & J) and spirit merchant, &c. (Isaac and Joseph); h Spring house
Burkill Isaac and Joseph, wine and spirit merchants
Burkill I. and J. maltsters, corn and general merchants
Burkill Joseph, spirit merchant, &c. (Isaac and Joseph); h Northlands house, Winterton
Burkill Robert Junior, farmer, The Cottage
Button George, brickmaker
Chapman Miss Catherine
Clark Mrs Hannah
Cordeaux Edmund, accountant
Dawson William, butcher
Driffill, Ralph, shoemaker
Everatt Charles, blacksmith
Gibson Thomas, cowkeeper
Gillatt John, joiner and wheelwright
Handson Gilbert Burton, butcher
Hesseltine Mrs Susannah
Kendall Holland, farmer
Kingsley William, victualler Ferry House
Kirkby Mrs Sarah, farmer
Knowles Rev Charles M.A., J.P., rector
Lord John, ship owner
Marshall William, farmer
Obridge William, tailor
Ogg Thomas, farmer
Oldridge Miss Elizabeth, dressmaker
Otter Mrs Hannah, grocer & draper
Otter John, bricklayer
Packer William, National schoolmaster
Parker Henry, farmer, Marsh
Pickersgill Benjamin, farmer
Pickersgill Mrs Sarah Ann, shopkeeper
Pickersgill William, shoemaker
Reynolds William, shopkeeper and joiner and parish clerk
Robinson Henry, carrier
Robinson Josiah, farmer
Rose Robert, carrier
Scarbrough John, farmer
Scarbrough Miss Mary Ann
Sewell Barratt, farmer, Grange
Sewell John, farm bailiff
Slater Henry, brick, tile and drain pipe maker
Slater John, brick and tile manufacturer
Slingsby Charles, shoemaker & agricultural machine owner
Slingsby Cooper, joiner and wheelwright
Snowden Robert, farmer
Spencer Mrs Ellen, milliner and dressmaker
Spencer George, skin dealer
Spencer Jabez, fellmonger
Sutton Mrs Ann
Sutton William, farmer
Towle Mr George
Wadd William, blacksmith
Waddingham Miss Ellen, dressmaker and schoolmistress
Waddingham John, ferry boat owner and beerhouse, Marsh
Warburton William, foreman maltster
Watkin John, grocer and draper
Wharton David, farmer

CARRIERS - Henry Robinson & Robert Rose, to Hull, Tuesday and Friday, and to Barton, on Monday

FERRY BOATS to Hull (for goods), Tuesday and Friday; John Waddingham and Matthew Beacock, proprietors.
 

Kelly’s 1885

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town (which formerly had a-market), parish and pleasant village on the south bank of the Humber, in the Northern division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division, of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Winterton, Glanford Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and diocese of Lincoln, 2½ miles north from Winterton, 7½ west from of Barton and 7 north from Appleby railway station ; on the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby railway, and on the river side are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber. The church of All Saints is a building of stone, in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of nave, aisles, south porch, transept and a western tower containing 5 bells : many of the windows are stained. The register dates from. the year 1562. The living is a rectory, tithe rent-charge £162, net yearly value £500, including 290 acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and held since 1866 by the Rev Charles Knowles M.A., J.P. formerly Dixie fellow of that college. There is a Wesleyan chapel and a Primitive Methodist chapel, built in 1837. The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £12, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a dole of Mr. Thomas Boothby's produces about £16 yearly. Edward Westoby, late of this place, also left, in 1873, the sum of £90, the interest of which is given annually each Christmas Day in bread to the poor. In the old Rectory House, now used as stables and outhouses, Henry Kirke White, the poet, was, in 1799, for a brief period under the tuition of Mr. Grainger. A pleasure fair is held on the 14th of July. About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring thought to possess great medicinal qualities, St. Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband, Egfrid, King of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at Winteringham haven,
when, turning aside to the village of West Halton, then called Alfham, at that time almost surrounded by marshes, she sought and received hospitality, and remaining there a short time, she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known by her name- William de S. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean York, having gone in 1143 to attend a council in London. was, during his absence, elected Bishop of Durham, and on his return to the city .of York, was met at Winteringham, and being informed of what had taken place was thereupon taken to the altar in Winteringham church, his election confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event. A Temperance Hall was built m 1882 for the parish, at a cost of about £300- Lord Carrington, of Wycombe Abbey, Bucks, who is the lord of the manor, and the Rev. Charles Knowles M,A.. J.P.
rector, and- owner of the glebe, are the principal landowners. The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone strata, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface. The chief crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and beans. The area is 3,979 acres of land and 1,705 of water, principally arising from the washing- away of the banks of the Humber ; rateable value,£5,381 10s. ; the population in 1881 was 671.
POST OFFICE.-Edmund Bickell, postmaster-  Letters through Doncaster arrive at 8-15 a-m- ; dispatched at 5-15
p.m. The nearest money order & telegraph office is at Winterton. There is no delivery or dispatch on Sundays

National School (mixed), built in 1845, & holding 150 children, with an average attendance of 90; the school is
supported by voluntary subscription & a government grant; Thomas Whitehead, master; Mrs. Sarah Whitehead, mistress

CARRIER.-Robert Cook Thornton & Henry Smith, to Barton, mon. ; to Hull, tues- & fri

WATER CONVEYANCE--Matthew Beacock, to Hull, tues. & Fri

Barratt John
Beacock Matthew
Brown Rev. Stafford Meredith [curate
of West Halton]
Burkill Edward W
Burkill Joseph, Manor house
Burkill John Robert
Dickinson Thomas
Knowles Rev. Charles M.A. J.P- [rector]
Scarborough Miss
Sutton John
Watkin John

COMMERCIAL,

Barr George, tailor
Barratt Thomas, farmer
Bates Samuel, miller (steam)
Beacock Matthew, ship owner
Bell Robert, Bay Horse P.H
Bickell Edmund, grocer &c
Bratten William, shoe maker
Bray Edwin, provision merchant
Bromby Edward, potato dealer
Brumby George, farmer
Brumby Martha (Miss), dress maker
Burkill Joseph, wine merchant & farmer, Manor house
Burkill Henry, farmer
Burkill Robert. coal merchant
Button George, brick & tile maker
Crawford Joseph, wheelwright
Dawson Thomas, butcher
Gillatt John, wheelwright
Hall Jason, blacksmith
Hookham George, grocer
Kendall Holland, farmer
Kirkby Sarah (Mrs.), farmer
Langton John, shoe maker
Leaberry Lawty, grocer
Marshall William, farmer
Otter Hannah (Miss), draper
Otter John, bricklayer
Patrick Robert, blacksmith
Pickersgill George, shoe maker
Pulleine Richard, farmer
Reynolds William, carpenter & grocer
Robinson Henry, cowkeeper
Robinson Josiah, farmer
Routh & Waddingham, shipbuilders
Sewell John, farmer. Grange
Simpson James, shopkeeper
Slater Henry, brick & tile maker
Slingsby Charles, machine owner
Smith Henry, carrier
Spencer Jabez, fellmngr, & rate collector
Sutton William, farmer
Sutton William. Walter, farmer
Thornton Robert Cook, Ferry Boat inn, carrier

Kelly’s 1889

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town (which formerly had a market), parish and pleasant village, situated on the south bank of the Humber, 2½ miles north from Winterton, 7½ west from Barton and 7 north from Appleby station on the South Yorkshire branch of the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire railway, in the North Lindsey division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Winterton, Glanford Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and diocese of Lincoln. On the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby railway, and on the river side are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber. The church of All Saints is a building of stone, in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of nave, aisles, south porch, transept and an embattled western tower with pinnacles containing 5 bells: many of the windows are stained: in the south aisle is a recumbent effigy of a Knight Templar in chain mail in a very good state of preservation : the chancel retains a piscina and credence table : there are 350 sittings. The register dates from the year 1562. The living is a rectory, tithe rent-charge £162, net yearly value £500, including 290 acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and held since 1866 by the Rev. Charles Knowles M.A. formerly Dixie fellow of that college, J.P. Here is a Wesleyan chapel and a Primitive Methodist chapel, built in 1837. The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £12, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a dole of Mr. Thomas Boothby's produces about £16 yearly. Edward Westoby late of this place, also left, in 1873, the sum of £90 the interest of which is given annually each Christmas day in bread to the poor. In the old Rectory house, now used as stables and outhouses, Henry Kirke White, the poet, was, for a brief period in 1799, under the tuition of Mr. Grainger. A pleasure fair is held on the 14th of July. About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities. St. Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband, Egfrid, King of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at Winteringham haven, when turning aside to the village of West Halton, then called "Alfham," at that time almost surrounded by marshes, she sought and received hospitality, and remaining there a short time, she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known by her name. William de S. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean of York, having gone in 1143 to attend a council in London, was, during his absence, elected bishop of Durham, and on his return was met at Winteringham, and taken to the altar in Winteringham church, where his election was confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event: he was bishop of Durham 1143-53. A Temperance Hall was built in 1882 for the parish, at a cost of about £300. Lord Carrington Q.C.M.G. who is lord of the manor, and the rector are the principal landowners. The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone stratum, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface. The chief crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and beans. The area is 3,979 acres of land and 1,705 of water, principally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber ; rateable value, £5,358 ; the population in 1881 was 671,

Parish Clerk, Henry Tapling [sic NB - spelt Tupling below]
POST & M.O.O., S. B. & Annuity & Insurance Office.
Edmund Bickell, postmaster. Letters through Doncaster
arrive at 8.30 a.m. , dispatched at 5.15 p.m. ; there is no
delivery or dispatch on Sundays. The nearest telegraph
office is at Winterton.
National School (mixed), built in 1845 & holding 150 children ; average attendance, 80; Thomas Whitehead, master ; Mrs, Sarah Whitehead, mistress
CARRIERS. Robert Cook Thornton, to Hull, tues. & fri.; & Henry Smith, to Barton, mon. & to Hull, tues. & fri
WATER CONVEYANCE.-Matthew Beacock, to Hull, tues
Barratt John
Beacock Matthew
Burkhill [sic] John Robert
Burkill Edward W
Burkill Joseph, Manor house
Dickinson Thomas
Knowles Rev. Charles M.A., J.P. Rectory
Preston Mrs
Sutton Mrs
Watkin Mrs

COMMERCIAL.

Barr George, tailor
Barratt Thomas, farmer
Bates Samuel, miller (steam)
Beacock Matthew, jun. ship owner
Bickell Edmund, grocer &c. Post office
Bray Edwin, draper & grocer
Brumby George, farmer
Brumby Martha (Miss), dress maker
Burkill Joseph, wine merchant & farmer, Manor house
Burkill Henry, farmer
Burkill Robert, coal merchant
Button George, brick & tile maker
Crawford Joseph, wheelwright
Dawson Thomas, butcher
Grassby Frederick Henry, farmer
Hall Jason, blacksmith
Hatter Elizabeth (Mrs.), Bay Horse P.H
Hookham George, grocer
Hull Brewery Co. maltsters (J. Warburton, manager)
Kendall Holland, farmer
Kempthorn Elizabeth (Mrs,), earthenware dealer
Kirkby Sarah (Mrs.), farmer
Langton John, shoe maker
Leaberry Lawty, grocer
Otter Hannah (Miss), draper & grocer
Otter John, builder
Patrick Robert, blacksmith
Pickersgill George, shoe maker
Pulleine Richard, farmer
Reynolds William, carpenter & grocer
Robinson Henry, cowkeeper
Robinson Josiah, farmer
Routh & Waddingham, shipbuilders
Sewell John, farmer, Grange
Simpson James, shopkeeper
Slater Henry, brick & tile maker
Slingsby Charles, machine owner
Smith Henry, carrier
Spencer Alfred, boot & shoe maker
Spencer Jabez, fellm[o]ng[e]r.& rate collector
Sutton John, grazier
Sutton William, farmer
Sutton William Walter, farmer
Temperance Hall
Thornton Robert Cook, Ferry Boat inn, & carrier
Tupling Henry, market gardener & parish clerk
Ward George, farmer
Weldon Walter, wheelwright & joiner

Kelly’s 1895

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town (which formerly had a market), parish and pleasant village, on the south bank of the Humber, 7 miles north from Appleby station on the Trent, Ancholme and Grimsby branch of the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire railway, 21/2 north from Winterton and 71/2 west from Barton, in the North Lindsey division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Winterton, Glanford Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and diocese of Lincoln. On the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby railway, and on the river side are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber. The church of All Saints is a building of stone in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, south porch, transept and an embattled western tower with pinnacles containing 5 bells: many of the windows are stained: in the south aisle is a recumbent effigy of a Knight Templar in chain mail in a very good state of preservation: the chancel retains a piscina and credence table: there are 350 sittings. The register dates from the year 1562. The living is a rectory, average tithe rent-charge £121, gross yearly value £472, including 290 acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and held since 1866 by the Rev. Charles Knowles M.A. and formerly Dixie fellow of that college, and J.P. Lincs. Here is a Wesleyan chapel, built in 1891, and a Primitive Methodist chapel, built in 1837. The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £12, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a benefaction left by Mr. Thomas Boothby produces about £16 yearly. Edward Westoby, late of this place, also left in 1873 the sum of £90, the interest of which is given annually each Christmas day in bread to the poor. In the old Rectory house, now used as stables and outhouses. Henry Kirke White, the poet, was for a brief period in 1799 under the tuition of Mr. Grainger. A pleasure fair is held under a charter granted in the reign of King John, on the 14th July. About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities. St. Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband, Egfrid, King of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at Winteringham Haven, when, turning aside to the village of West Halton, then called "Alfham," at that time almost surrounded by marshes, she sought and received hospitality, and remaining there a short time, she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known by her name. William de S. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean of York, having gone in 1143 to attend a council in London, was during his absence elected bishop of Durham, and on his return was met at Winteringham and taken to the altar in Winteringham church, where his election was confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event: he was bishop of Durham 1143-53. A Temperance Hall was built in 1882 for the parish, at a cost of about £300. Earl Carrington P.C., G.C.M.G. who is lord of the manor, and the rector are the principal landowners. The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone stratum, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface. The chief crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and beans. The area is 3,588 acres of land, 689 of tidal water, principally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber, and 274 of foreshore; rateable value, £4,967; the population in 1891 was 584.

Parish Clerk, Henry Toplin.
Post & M. 0. 0., S. B. & Annuity & Insurance Office.- Edmund Bickell, sub-postmaster. Letters through Doncaster arrive at 8.40 a.m.; dispatched of 5.15 p.m.; there is no delivery or dispatch on Sundays. The nearest telegraph office is at Winterton.

National School (mixed), built in 1845, & holding 143 children; average attendance, 70; Miss Marion & Miss Sabina Marr, mistresses

Carriers.- John Thornton, to Hull, tues. & fri.; Henry Smith, to Barton, mon. & to Hull, tues. & fri. & John Thornton, to Brigg, thurs

Water Conveyance.-Matthew Beacock, to Hull, tues Beacock Matthew, sen

Burkill Joseph, Manor house
Burkill Miss
Grassby Henry
Knowles Rev. Chas. J.P., M.A. Rectory
Otter Miss
Waddingham William
Watkin Mrs

COMMERCIAL.

Barr George, tailor
Barratt Thomas, farmer
Bates Samuel, miller (steam), Alexandra mills
Beacock George, farmer
Beacock Matthew, jun. ship owner & district councillor
Bickell Edmd. grocer & c. Post office
Bray Edwin, draper & grocer
Brumby George, farmer
Brumby William, farmer
Burkill Joseph, farmer. Manor house
Burkill Henry, farmer
Burkill William, coal merchant
Button Henry, brick & tile maker
Cordeaux Edmund, commission agent
Crawford Joseph, wheelwright
Cross James, farmer
Dawson Thomas, butcher
Grassby Frederick Henry, farmer
Grassby Henry, brewer & patentee of bottle washing plant, Tinkle brewery
Hall Jason, blacksmith
Hatter Elizh. (Mrs.), Bay Horse P.H
Hookham George, grocer
Howden Wilson, wheelwright
Kempthorn Thomas, earthenware dlr
Langton John, shoe maker
Moor & Robsons Limited, maltsters (Enoch Coupland, manager)
Patrick Robert, blacksmith
Pickersgill George, shoe maker
Porkess Charles Henry. bricklayer
Robinson Josiah, farmer
Routh & Waddingham, ship builders
Sewell John, farmer, Grange
Simpson James, shopkeeper
Skinner John William, grocer
Slingsby Edwd. & Geo. machine owners
Slingsby John, farmer
Smith Henry, carrier
Spencer Jabez, marine store dealer
Storm John, farmer
Sutton Elizabeth (Mrs.), farmer
Sutton William Walter, farmer
Temperance Hall
Thornton John, carrier
Thornton Anne (Mrs.), Ferry Boat inn
Toplin Henry, market gardener & parish clerk

 

Kelly's 1900

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town (which formerly had a market), parish and pleasant village, on the south bank of the Humber, 7 miles north from Appleby station on the Trent, Ancholme and Grimsby branch of the Great Central (M S and L) railway, 2½ north from Winterton and 7½ west from Barton in the North Lindsey division of the county, parts of Lindsey. Northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Winterton, Glanford Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and Diocese of Lincoln. On the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby railway and on the riverside are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber. The church of All Saints is a building of stone in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, south porch, transept and an embattled western tower with pinnacles containing 5 bells: many of the windows are stained: in the south aisle is a recumbent effigy of a Knight Templar in chain mail in a very good state of preservation: the chancel retains a piscina and credence table: in 1899 a hot water heating apparatus was added, and other alterations made, at a cost of £250: there are 350 sittings. The register dates from the year 1562. The living is a rectory, net yearly value £439, including 290 acres of glebe with residence in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge and held since 1899 by the Rev. Henry Townsend Sale M.A. formerly scholar of that College. Here is a Wesleyan chapel built in 1891 and a Primitive Methodist chapel built in 1837. The poor have yearly, in coals and money the sum of about £12 arising from the bequest of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a benefaction left by Mr Thomas Boothby produces about £16 yearly. Edward Westoby, late of this place also left in 1873 the sum of £90, the interest of which is given annually each Christmas day to the poor. In the old Rectory house now used as stables and out-houses, Henry Kirke White the poet was for a brief period in 1799 under the tuition of Mr Grainger. A pleasure fair is held, under a charter granted in the reign of King John on the 14th July. About half a mile east of the village the Roman town, Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities. St Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband Egfrid, king of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at the village of Winteringham haven, when turning aside to the village of West Halton, then called "Alfham" at the time almost surrounded by marshes, she sought and received hospitality and remaining there a short time she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known by her name. William de. S. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean of York, having gone in 1143 to attend Council in London, was during his absence elected bishop of Durham, and on his return was met at Winteringham and taken to the altar in Winteringham Church, where his election was confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event: he was bishop of Durham 1143 - 53. A Temperance Hall was built in 1882 for the parish at a cost of about £300. Earl Carrington P.C., G.C.M.G who is lord of the manor, and the rector are the principal landowners. The soil is a rich loam resting on the oolitic limestone stratum, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface. The chief crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and beans. The area is 3,588 acres of land, 689 of tidal water, principally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber and 274 of foreshore; rateable value £4770; the population in 1891 was 584.

Kelly's 1905

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town (which formerly had a market), parish and pleasant village, on the South bank of the Humber, 7 miles north from Appleby station, on the Trent, Ancholme and Grimsby branch of the Great Central (M S. and L.) rail- way, 2½ north from Winterton and 7½ west from Barton, in the North Lindsey division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Scunthorpe, Glanford Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber. rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and diocese of Lincoln, On the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby railway, and on the river side are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber. The church of All Saints is a building of stone in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, south porch, transept and an embattled western tower with pinnacles containing 5 bells : many of the windows are stained: in the south aisle is a recumbent effigy of a Knight Templar in chain mail in a very good state of preservation: the chancel retains a piscina and credence table: in 1899 heating apparatus was provided, and other alterations made, at a cost of £250: there are 350 sittings. The register dates from the year 1562. The living is a rectory, net yearly value £442, including 290 acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and held since 1899 by the Rev. Henry Townsend Sale M.A. and formerly scholar of that college. Here is a Wesleyan chapel, built in 1891, and a Primitive Methodist chapel, built in 1837. The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £12, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a benefaction left by Mr, Thomas Boothby produce's about £16 yearly. Edward Westoby, late of this place, also left in 1873 the sum of £90, the interest of which is given annually each Christmas day in bread to the poor. In the old Rectory house, now used as stables and outhouses, Henry Kirke White, the poet, was for a brief period in 1799 under the tuition of Mr. Grainger. A pleasure fair is held, under a charter granted in the reign of King John on the 14th July. About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities. St. Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband, Egfrid, King of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at Winteringham haven, when, turning a-side to the village of West Halton, then called " Alfham," and at that time almost surrounded by marshes, she sought and received hospitality, and remaining there, a short time she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known, by her name. William de S. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean of York, having gone in 1143 to attend a council in London, was during his absence elected bishop of Durham, and on his return was met at Winteringham and taken to the altar in Winteringham church, where his election was confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event: he was bishop of Durham 1143-53. A Temperance Hall was built in 1882 for the parish, at a cost of about £300. Earl Carrington P.C., G.C.M.G. who is lord of the manor, and the rector are the principal landowners. The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone stratum, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface. The chief crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and beans. The area is 3,588 acres of land, 689 of tidal water, principally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber, and 274 of foreshore; rateable value, £4,770; population in 1901, 595

Parish Clerk, Samuel Leaberry.

Post, M. 0. & T. 0., T. M. 0.. E. D.. P. P., S. H. & A.& I. Office.-Edmund Bickell, sub-postmaster. Letters through Doncaster arrive at 8.40 a.m. ; dispatched
at 8.45 a.m. & 5.45 p.m. ; there is no delivery or dispatch on sundays
Public Elementary School (mixed), built in 1845 & holding 143 children.; average attendance, 81; Henry Thorp, master
Carriers. -George Clayton, to Hull, tues. & fri.
Henry Smith, to Barton, mon, & to Hull, tues. & fri
Water Conveyance.-Tom Barley, to Hull, tues

Baker George
Burkill Mrs, Spring house
Burkill Miss
Dickinson Miss, Rosamond
Sale Rev. Henry Townsend M.A. Rectory
Watkin Mrs

COMMERCIAL.

Barr George, tailor
Barratt Thomas, farmer
Beacock George, farmer
Bickell Edmd. grocer &c. Post office
Bray Edwin, draper & grocer
Brumby George, farmer
Brumby William, farmer
Burkill Henry, farmer
Burkill William, coal merchant
Button Henry, brick & tile maker
Clayton George, carrier
Cordeaux Edmund, commission agent
Crawford Joseph, wheelwright
Dawson Thomas, butcher
Goodman John E. Bay Horse P.H. & farmer
Handson George, butcher
Harrison Robert B. farmer
Hookham George, grocer
Howden Wilson, wheelwright & farmer
Kempthorn Thomas, earthenware dealer
Leaberry Samuel, farmer & parish clerk
Lockwood John, farmer
Lowson Peter, miller, roller flour mills (steam)
Moor & Robsons Limited, maltsters (William Wiles, manager)
Patrick Robert, blacksmith
Pickersgill George, shoe maker
Porkess Charles Henry, bricklayer
Robinson Josiah, farmer
Robinson Mary E. (Mrs.), shopkeeper
Routh & Waddingham, ship builders
Sewell John, farmer, West farm
Sewell Walter, farmer. Grange
Simon Joseph, farmer, Eastfield
Slingsby Edward. & George machine owners
Smith Henry, carrier
Spencer Jabez, marine store dealer
Storm John William, farmer
Sutton Herbert, farmer
Sutton Wm. Walt. farmer. Manor farm
Temperance Hall
Thornton Walt. Thos. Ferry Boat Inn

 

Kelly’s 1909

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town (which formerly had a market), parish and pleasant village, on the south bank of the Humber, with a temporary terminal station of the North Lindsey Light railway, and is 7 miles north from Appleby -station on the Trent, Ancholme and Grimsby branch of the Great Central railway, 2½ north from Winterton and 7½ west from Barton, in the North Lindsey division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Scunthorpe, Glanford Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and diocese of Lincoln. On the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby railway, and on the river side are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber. The church of All Saints is a building of stone in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, south porch, transept and an embattled western tower with pinnacles containing 5 bells: many of the windows are stained: in the south aisle is a recumbent effigy of a knight in chain mail in a very good state of preservation: the chancel retains a piscina and credence table: in 1899 heating apparatus was provided, and other alterations made, at a cost of £250: the lead roof of the tower was entirely renewed and the masonry repaired in 1906 at a cost of £287: there are 330 sittings. The register dates from the year 1562. The living is a rectory, net yearly value £440, including 290 acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and held since 1899 by the Rev. Henry Townsend Sale M.A. of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and rural dean of Manlake, who was formerly scholar of that college. Here is a Wesleyan chapel, built in 1891, and a Primitive Methodist chapel, built in 1837. A Club with reading room has been provided by Earl Carrington K.G. The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £12, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a benefaction left by Mr. Thomas Boothby produces about £16 yearly. Edward Westoby late of this place, also left in 1873 the sum of £90 the interest of which is given annually each Christmas day in bread to the poor. In the old Rectory house, now used as stables and outhouses. Henry Kirke White, the poet, was for a brief period in 1799 under the tuition of the Rev Mr. Grainger, then curate of the parish.  A pleasure fair is held, under a charter granted in the reign of King John, on the 14th July.  About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities.   St. Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband, Egfrid, King of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at Winteringham haven, when, turning aside to the village of West Halton, then called "Alfham," and at that time almost surrounded by marshes, she sought and received hospitality, and remaining there a short time, she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known, by her name. William de S. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean of York, having gone in 1143 to attend a council in London, was during his absence elected bishop of Durham, and on his return was met at Winteringham and taken to the altar in Winteringham church, where his election was confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event: he was bishop of Durham 1143-53. A Temperance Hall was built in 1882 for the parish, at a cost of about £300. Earl Carrington K.G., P.C., G.C.M.G. who is lord of the manor, and the rector are the principal landowners. The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone stratum, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface. The chief crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and beans. The area is 3,588 acres of land, 689 of tidal water, principally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber, and 274 of foreshore; rateable value, £5,095; population in 1901,  595.

Parish Clerk, Samuel Leaberry.
Post, M. O. & T. Office.- Edmund Bickell, sub-postmaster. The delivery of letters via Doncaster commences at 8.50 a.m. & 3 p.m.; dispatched at 8.45 a.m. & 5.45 p.m.; there is no delivery or dispatch on Sundays
Public Elementary School (mixed), built in 1845 &  holding 143 children; average attendance, 81; Henry  Thorp, master
Railway Station, Herbert James Richards, station master
Carriers.- George Clayton, to Hull, tues. & fri.; Wm. Henry Smith, to Barton, mon. & to Hull, tues. & fri
Water Conveyance.-Alfred Barley, to Hull, tues

Burkill Miss, The Nest
Burkill Mrs. Spring house
Dickinson Mrs. Rosamond
Dodds John
Dudding Miss
Sale Rev, Henry Townsend M.A. (rector, & rural dean), Rectory

COMMERCIAL

Barratt & Sons, farmers
Barratt Thomas, farmer
Bickell Edmd. grocer &c. Post office
Booth Arthur, shopkeeper
Bray Edwin, draper & grocer
Brumby George Marshall, farmer
Brumby William, farmer
Burkill Henry, coal merchant
Burkill Henry, farmer
Clark George P. farmer
Clayton George, carrier
Clayton Herbert, cycle dealer
Cordeaux Edmund, commission agent
Crawford Joseph, wheelwright
Dawson Joseph & Twidale Fredk. frmrs
Dawson Cecilia (Mrs.), butcher
Ford Robt. H. grazier, Read's island
Goodman John E. Bay Horse P.H.
Goodman Rowland, coal dealer
Handson George, butcher
Hewitt John, farmer
Howden Wilson, farmer
Leaberry Samuel, farmer & parish clrk
Moor & Robsons Limited, maltsters
North Lincoln Chemical Manufacturing Co. chemical manufacturers
Patrick Robert, blacksmith
Pickersgill George, shoe maker
Porkess Charles Henry, bricklayer
Routh Arth. Jn.& Ernest Jsph joinrs
Routh & Waddingham, ship builders
Sewell John, farmer, West farm
Sewell Walter, farmer, Grange
Sharpe James, Ferry Boat inn
Simon John, farmer, Eastfield
Slingsby E.&G. thrashing. Machn. ownrs
Smith Henry, fruit grower
Smith William Henry, carrier
Spencer Frederick, insurance agent
Storm Thos. & Beacock Geo. farmers
Storm, John, farmer
Sutton Herbert, farmer
Sutton Wm. Walt. Farmer, Manor frm
Temperance Hall
Village Club & Reading Room (Harold Bray, hon. sec)
Wilson Herbert King, corn dealer

Kelly’s 1913

Winteringham is an old corporate town (which formerly had a market), parish and pleasant village, on the south bank of the Humber, with a station on the North Lindsey light railway, and is 7 miles north from Appleby station on the Trent, Ancholme and Grimsby branch of the Great Central railway, 2½ miles north from Winterton and 7½ miles west from Barton, in the North Lindsey division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Scunthorpe, Glanford Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and diocese of Lincoln.  On the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby railway, and on the river side are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber.  The church of All Saints is a building of stone in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of a chancel, nave aisles, south porch, transept and embattled western tower with pinnacles containing 5 bells: many of the windows are stained: in the south aisle is a recumbent effigy of a knight in chain mail in a very good state of preservation: the chancel retains a piscina and credence table: in 1899 heating apparatus was provided, and other alterations made, at a cost of £250: the lead roof of the tower was entirely renewed and the masonry repaired in 1906 at a cost of £287: there are 350 sittings.  The register dates from the year 1562.  The living is a rectory, net yearly value £456, including 290 acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.  Here is a Wesleyan chapel, built in 1891, and a Primitive Methodists chapel built in 1837.  A Club with reading room was provided by the Marquis of Lincolnshire K.G., P.C., G.C.M.G.  The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £12, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough [sic], Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a benefaction left by Mr. Thomas Boothby produces about £16 yearly.  Edward Westoby, late of this place, also left in 1873 the sum of £90, the interest of which is given annually each Christmas day in bread to the poor.  In the old Rectory house, Henry Kirke White, the poet, was for a brief period in 1799 [sic] under the tuition of the Rev. Mr. Grainger, then curate of the parish.  A pleasure fair is held, under a charter granted in the reign of King John, on the 14th July.  About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood.  Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities.  St. Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband, Egfrid, King of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at Winteringham haven, when, turning aside to the village of West Halton, then called "Alfham," and at that time almost surrounded by marshes, she sought and received hospitality, and remaining there a short time, she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known by her name.  William de S. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean of York, having gone in 1143 to attend a council in London, was during his absence elected bishop of Durham, and on his return was met at Winteringham and taken to the altar in Winteringham church, where his election was confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event: he was bishop of Durham 1143-53.  A Temperance Hall was built in 1882 for the parish, at a cost of about £300.  The Marquis of Lincolnshire K.G., P.C., G.C.M.G. who is lord of the manor, and the rector are the principal landowners.  The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone stratum, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface.  The crops are wheat, barley, oats, potatoes and beans.  The area is 3,471 acres of land, about 690 of tidal water, prinicipally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber, and 270 of foreshore; rateable value £4,964; population in 1911, 606
Parish Clerk, Samuel Leaberry
Post, M.O. & T Office. - Edmund Bickell, sub-postmaster.  The delivery of letters via Doncaster commences at 8.50 a.m. & 3.5 p.m.; dispatched at 8.30 a.m. & 3.25 & 5.35 p.m.; there is no delivery or dispatch on sundays [sic].

Public Elementary School (mixed), built in 1845 & holding 110 children; average attendance, 86; Henry Fred Draper, master

Railway Station, Theophilus Teall, station master

Carriers. - George Clayton, to Hull, tues & fri; William Henry Smith, to Barton, mon. & to Hull, tues. & fri

Water Conveyance. - Alfred Barley, to Hull, tues

Burkill Miss, The Nest
Burkill Mrs. Spring house
Cordeaux Edmund
Dickinson Mrs. Rosamond
Dodds John
Dudding Miss
Potts Rev. Charles Marsden M.A. (rector), Rectory

COMMERCIAL

Early closing day, Thursday 1 p.m.
Andrew David L. grocer, confectioner, tobacconist & general stores
Barley Thomas, market gardener
Barratt & Sons, farmers
Barratt Thomas, farmer
Bickell Edmund, grocer &c. Post office
Birdman Carl, sausage skin dealer
Birdman George, sausage skin dealer
Blanchard Arthur, farmer
Booth Arthur, shopkeeper
Bray Edwin, draper & grocer
Brumby Charles, farmer
Brumby Mary Ann (Mrs.), farmer
Brumby Tom, farmer
Burkill Henry, coal merchant
Burkill Henry, farmer
Burkill Isaac, keel owner
Clark Charles, assistant overseer
Clark George P. farmer
Clayton George, carrier
Clayton Herbert, cycle dealer
Crawford Joseph, wheelwright
Dawson Joseph & Twidale Frederick, farmers
Dawson Cecilia (Mrs.), butcher
Ford Robert H. grazier, Read's island
Goodman Eden (Mrs.), Bay Horse P.H.
Goodman Rowland, coal dealer
Handson George William, butcher
Hewitt John, farmer
Howden John, boot repairer
Leaberry Samuel, farmer & parish clerk
London Joint Stock Bank Limited (sub-branch) (open tues. only 10 to 12.30); draw on head office, 5 Princes street, London, EC
Moor & Robsons Limited, maltsters
North Lincoln Chemical Manufacturing Co. chemical manufacturers
Patrick Robert, blacksmith
Porkess Charles Henry, bricklayer
Routh Arthur John & Ernest Joseph joiners
Routh & Waddingham, boat builders
Sergeant Henry F solicitor; attends Mondays 2.30 to 5.30 p.m.
Sewell John, farmer, West farm
Sewell Walter, farmer, Grange
Sharp James, Ferry Boat inn
Simon John, farmer, Eastfield
Slingsby E & G thrashing machine owners
Smith Henry, fruit grower
Spencer Frederick, insurance agent
Storm Thomas & Beacock George farmers
Storm John, farmer
Sutton Herbert, farmer
Sutton William Walter farmer, Manor farm
Temperance Hall
Village Club & Reading Room (Harold Bray, hon. Sec)

Kelly’s 1919

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town (which formerly had a market), parish and pleasant village, on the south bank of the Humber, with a station on the North Lindsey light railway, and is 7 miles north from Appleby station on the Trent, Ancholme and Grimsby branch of the Great Central railway, 2½ north from Winterton and 7½ west from Barton, in the Brigg division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Scunthorpe, Glanford Brigg union, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and diocese of Lincoln- On the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby railway, and on the river side are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber-  The church of All Saints is a building of stone in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, south porch, transept and an embattled western tower with pinnacles containing' 5 bells: many of the windows are stained: in the south aisle is a recumbent effigy of a knight in chain mail in a very good state of preservation: the chancel retains a piscina and credence table: in 1899 heating apparatus was provided, and other alterations made, at a cost of £250: the lead roof of the tower was entirely renewed and the masonry re- paired in 1906 at a cost of £287: there are 350 sittings- The register dates from the year 1562, The living is a rectory, net yearly value £486, with residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and held since 1911 by the Rev. Charles Marsden Potts M.A- of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.  Here is a Wesleyan chapel, built in 1891, and a Primitive Methodist chapel, built in 1837,  A club with reading room has been provided by the Marquis of Lincolnshire.  The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £12, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a benefaction left by Mr  Thomas Boothby produces about £16 yearly, Edward Westoby, late of this place, also left in 1873 the sum of £90, the interest of which is given annually each Christmas day in bread to the poor.  In the  old Rectory house, now used as stables and out- houses. Henry Kirke White, the poet, -was for a brief period in 1799 under the tuition of the Rev. Mr. Grainger, then curate of the parish. A pleasure fair is held, under a charter granted in the reign of King John, on the 14th July-  About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum. is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities,   St. Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband, Egfrid, King of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at Winteringham haven, when, turning aside to the village of West Halton, then called Alfham and at that time almost surrounded bv marshes, she sought and received hospitality, and remaining there a short time, she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known by her name. William de St. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean of York, having gone in 1143 to attend a council in London, was during his absence elected bishop of Durham, and on his return was met at Winteringham and taken to the altar in Winteringham church, where his election was confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event: he was bishop of Durham 1143-53- A Temperance Hall was built in 1882 for the parish, at a cost of about ,£300. The Marquis of Lincolnshire is lord of the manor, and principal landowner. The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone stratum, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface, The chief crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and beans. The area is 3,471 acres of land, about 690 of tidal water, principally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber, and 270 of foreshore; rateable value, £4,968 ; the population in 1911, 606.
Parish Clerk, Samuel Leaberry,

Post, M.O., & T Office.-Mrs. Martha E- Robinson, sub-postmistress. There is no delivery or dispatch on Sundays

Public Elementary School (mixed), built in 1845 & holding 110 children; Frederick Talbot, master

Railway Station, Herbert Unsworth, station master

Carriers.-George Clayton, to Hull, fri-; William Henry Smith, to Barton, mon. & to Hull, tues

Water Conveyance.-Barley Brothers, to Hull, mon

Burkill Mrs
Dudding Miss
Griffiths E
Hollingsworth William
Morrison Patrick ,
Potts Rev. Charles Marsden M.A. (rector), -Rectory

COMMERCIAL.

Early closing day, Thurs. 1 p.m.
Marked thus † farm 150 acres or over.
†Barratt & Sons, farmers
†Barratt Thomas, farmer
Birkinshaw John W. Bay Horse P.H
Booth Arthur, shopkeeper
Bray Edwin, draper & grocer
Brumby Charles, farmer
Brumby Edward, farmer
Brumby Tom, farmer
Burkill Henry, coal merchant
Burkill Henry, farmer
Clark Charles, assistant overseer
Clark George P. farmer
Clayton George, carrier
Clayton Herbert, cycle dealer
Coleby William, fishmonger
Crawford Joseph, wheels right
†Dawson Jsph, &, Twidale Frdk.frmrs
Dawson Walter S, butcher
Field Mary E. (Mrs), Ferry Boat inn
Hewitt John, smallholder
Kirkby J. grazier, Read's island
Langton William, smallholder
Leaberry Samuel, farmer & parish clrk
London Joint Stock Bank Limited
(sub-branch) (open tues. only 10
to 12.30); draw on head office,
5 Princes street, London E C 2
Moor & Robsons Limited, maltsters
Patrick Robert, blacksmith
Porkess Charles Henry, bricklayer
Robinson Martha (Mrs.), shopkeeper,
& post office
Routh Arth. Jn-& Ernest Jsph.joinrs
Routh & Waddingham, boat builders
Sawyer William D, D. farmer
Short James, coal dealer
†Simon Jesse & Alfd. farmers, Eastfld
Simon Arthur, farmer. West farm
Simon Fred, farmer
Slingsby E&G thrashng.machn ownrs
Slingsby Walter, farmer
Smith Henry, fruit grower
Smith William Henry, carrier
†Storm Thos.& Beacock Geo. farmers
Storm. John, farmer
Sutton Herbert, farmer
†Sutton Wm.Walt.farmer. Manor frm.
Teal Alfred, boot repairer
Waddington Henry, grocer
Temperance Hall
Village Club & Reading Room (Harry Green, hon. sec)

Kelly’s 1933

WINTERINGHAM is an old corporate town (which formerly had a market), parish and pleasant village, on the south bank of the Humber, with a station on the London and North Eastern light mineral railway, and is 7 miles north from Appleby station on the Trent, Ancholme and Grimsby branch of the same railway, 2½ north from Winterton and 7½ west from Barton, in the Brigg division of the county, parts of Lindsey, northern division of the wapentake of Manley, petty sessional division of Scunthorpe, Glanford Brigg rural district, county court district of Barton-upon-Humber, rural deanery of Manlake, archdeaconry of Stow and diocese of Lincoln. On the opposite shore of the Humber is a station of the Hull and Selby section of the London and North Eastern railway, and on the river side are wharves for corn, malt, coal and timber. The church of All Saints is a building of stone in the Norman and Early English styles, consisting of chancel, nave aisles, south porch, transept and an embattled western tower with pinnacles containing 5 bells; many of the windows are stained; in the chancel is a recumbent effigy of a knight in chain mail in a very good state of preservation: the chancel retains a piscina and credence table;  in 1899 heating apparatus was provided, and other alterations made, at a cost of £350: the lead roof of the tower was entirely renewed and the masonry repaired in 1906 at a cost of £287: there are 350 sittings,   The register dates from the year 1562.   The living is a rectory, net yearly value £578, with 5 acres of glebe and residence, in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and held since 1928 by the Rev. George Frazier Upton M.A. of that college.   Here are two Methodist chapels, one built in 1891, and the other in 1837. A club with reading room was provided by the 1st and last Marquis of Lincolnshire K.G., P.C., G.C.M.G. (d. 1928). The poor have yearly, in coals and money, the sum of about £9, arising from the bequests of the Rev. Thomas Adam, Eleanor Scarborough, Roger Manners and Thomas Middleton, and a benefaction left by Mr. Thomas Boothby produces about £16 yearly.  Edward Westoby, late of this place, also left in 1873 the sum of £90, the interest of which is given annually each Christmas day in bread to the poor. In the old Rectory house, now used as stables and outhouses, Henry Kirke White, the poet, was for a brief period in 1799 under the tuition of the Rev. Mr. Grainger, then curate of the parish. A pleasure fair is held, under a charter granted in the reign of King John, on the 14th July. About half a mile east of the village the Roman town Ad Abum is supposed to have stood. Near the village is a chalybeate spring, thought to possess great medicinal qualities. St. Etheldreda, when she fled from her second husband. Egfrid, King of Northumbria, in order to devote herself to a religious life, crossed the Humber and landed at Wintringham haven, when, turning aside to the village of West Halton, then called "Alfham," and at that time almost surrounded by marshes, she sought and received hospitality, and remaining there a short time, she built on that spot a church, which was dedicated in her honour, and is still known by her name. William de S. Barbara, a monk of Durham and dean of York, having gone in 1143 to attend a council in London, was during his absence elected bishop of Durham, and on his return was met at Winteringham and taken to the altar in Winteringham church, where his election was confirmed and a Te Deum sung to commemorate the event: he was bishop of Durham 1143-53. A Temperance Hall was built in 1882 for the parish, at a cost of about £300. The trustees of the late Marquis of Lincolnshire K.G., P.C., G.C.M.G. are lords of the manor; the land is owned chiefly by the farmers. The soil is a rich loam, resting on the oolitic limestone stratum, which in this neighbourhood is but a little distance from the surface. The chief crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and beans. The area is 3,471 acres of land, about 690 of tidal water, principally arising from the washing away of the banks of the Humber, and 270 of foreshore; the population in 1921 was 747.

Post, M. O., T. & T. E. D. Office.   Letters through Scunthorpe, Lincs
Railway Station (L. & N. E)
Carrier.-Altoft, to Scunthorpe, daily
Water Conveyance.-Barley Brothers to Hull, on mon. & back on tues
A motor omnibus service connects with Scunthorpe

PRIVATE RESIDENTS.

(For T N's see general list of Private Residents at end of book.)
Barraclough   Frederick   Samuel, Hawksworth.
Beacock George
Draper Fred, The Cottage
Hudson William, Laurel cottage
Morrison Mrs. E
Sewell Mrs
Upton Rev. George Frazier M.A. (rector), Rectory

COMMERCIAL,.
Early closing day, Thursday.
Marked thus † farm 150 acres or over.
Altoft William E. motor omnibus proprietor. TN Winterton 11X2
†Barratt Wltr. & Hy. farmers. Marsh farm
Bell Luther Rt. boot repr
Booth Arth. shopkpr
Bray Harold, grocer
Brumby Tom, farmer
Burkinshaw Jsph. Wm. blacksmith
Burton Wltr. Hy. baker
Button Harry, farmer
Button John E. coal merchant. TN Winterton 11Y1
Clarke & Sons, farmers
Clarke Chas. F. rate collector
Clayton Chas. Edwd. & Herbt. Millers (oil)
Clayton Herbert, cycle dealer
Cox Jn. Rt.  smallholder.   TN Winterton 11Y4
Crawford Walter, wheelwright
Dawson Walter S. butcher
Draper Fredk. V. greengro
Ellis Minnie (Mrs.), shopkeeper
Field Mary E. (Mrs.), Ferry Boat inn
Guilliatt Geo. farmer. East field
Hall Percival, pork butcher
Humble Lewin Rd. farmer, see Waterworth & Humble
Kirkby Fredk. farmer, Read's island
Middleton Harold, poultry farmer, The Orchard
Midland Bank Ltd. (sub-branch) (open tues. only 10.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.) ; head office. Poultry, London E C 2
†0gg & Sons, farmers
Parkinson Martha (Miss), newsagt
Robinson Chas. fried fish dlr
Routh Ernest Jsph, bldr
†Sawyer Gordon D. farmer. The Grange
†Scunthorpe  Co-operative  Society Ltd. farmers. Manor & Glebe farms. T.N Winterton 11X3
Sewell George William, farmer
Simon Alfred, farmer
Simon Arth, farmer, West farm
Simon Fred, farmer. Low farm,
Smith, Archie W. farmer. Sycamore ho
Smith Arth. Bay Horse P.H
Smith Wm. Hy. fruit grower. TN Winterton 11Y2
Sutton Bros. farmers, West End farm
Sutton Harry Victor, farmer
Sutton Herbert, farmer
Teal Alfd. boot repr
Temperance Hall
Village  Club  &  Reading Room (Harry Birkill, hon. sec)
Waddingham J, (Miss), grocer
Wardle Annie L. (Mrs.), grocer, & post. office
Waterworth & Humble, farmers, Sluice farm (letters through South Ferriby)
 

From other sections of Kelly’s 1933 Directory:

Private Residents
Barraclough Fredk. Saml. Hawksworth TN Winterton 11X5
Private Residents
Beacock Geo.
Morrison Mrs E.
Sewell, Mrs. TN Winterton 11X1
Upton Rev G Frazier, M.A. TN Winteron 11Y3

Trades
Boot & Shoe Repairers

Bell L R
Teal A.

Builders
Routh Ernest Joseph

Clubs - Working Men's
Winteringham Village Club & Reading Room (Harry Birkill, hon. sec).

Farmers
(† indicates farms more than 150 acres)
†Barratt Wltr & Hy, Marsh farm
Brumby T.
Button H.
Clarke & Sons
Gilliatt Geo. Eastfield
Kirkby Fredk Lead island [sic - should read Read's island]
†Ogg & Sons
†Sawyer Gordon D. The Grange
Sewell G. W.
Simon Alfred
Simon Arthur
Simon F.
Sutton Bros.
Sutton H.
Sutton H. Victor

Fried Fish Dealers
Robinson Chas.

Fruit Growers
Smith Wm. H.

Fruiterers & Greengrocers
Draper Fredk. V.

Grocers & Tea Dealers
Bray Harold
Waddingham Miss J.
Wardle Mrs Annie L. Post Office

Millers
Clayton Chas. Edwd. & Herbt. (oil) ["oil" refers to drive-power]

Motor Omnibus Proprs.
Altoft Wm. E.

Pork Butchers
Hall Percvl.

Poultry Farmers
Middleton Harold, The Orchard

Public Halls
Winteringham Temperance

Public Houses
Bay Horse Arth. Smith
Ferry Boat inn, Mrs. M. E. Field

Shopkeepers
Booth A.

Smith, Blacksmiths and Farriers
Burkinshaw Jsph. Wm.

Wheelwrights
Crawford Walt.


 

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