Farming Figures for Winteringham

Winteringham Local History and Genealogy

The Co-op Farm, Winteringham The Co-op Farm with (on the horse) Arthur Bell; on the cart: Joe Tuplin, George Borrill, and Stan Earl; on the ground: Herb Earl and Joe Bratton.  Also see below for details of the sale of this farm.

Farming Statistics from One Year in the 1960s

Acreage
441
860
98

Acreage
5
4
181
227
6
7
 

Acreage
22
0
0

Acreage
81
59
27
580
122
 

Number
42
1
69
215

Number
999
24
778

Cereals
Wheat
Barley
Oats

Root Crops
Kale
Early potatoes
Main crop potatoes
Sugar beet
Turnips. swedes, fooder beet
Mangolds
 

Beans, Peas, Brussels
Beans for stock feeding
Peas
Brussels

Grass
Temporary grass for mowing
Permanent grass for mowing
Temporary grass for grazing
Permanent grass for grazing
Rough grazings
 

Cattle
Cows in milk or in calf
Bulls in service
Other cattle (female)
Other cattle (male)

Sheep
Lambs
Rams kept for service
Others

 

Number
285

Number
722
35
5
40
 

Pigs
Pigs

Poultry
Chickens
Ducks
Geese
Turkeys
 

Number
24
17
28

Number
5
1
1
6
3
8
1
 

Workers
Regular
Part-time
Seasonal

Size of holding
Up to 5 acres
15-19 acres
20-30 acres
50-100 acres
100-150 acres
150-300 acres
300-500acres
 

See also:

Farmers

Farms

Old Barn Ferry Lane, Winteringham
Old Barn photos

Manor Farm
The stories of Katharine Willis

Manor Farm photos 2

Manor Farm - Cattle

Manor Farm
The Sale Catalogue 1958


 

Winteringham Farms in the News ...
Manor Farm sale 1882

Mr Burkhill is presented with valuable silver salver
From the Hull Packet 7th December 1838

Barton – A large party of gentlemen farmers dined together at the White Lion Inn, Barton, on Monday last, when a silver salver, value 50, was presented to Mr Burkhill, of Winteringham, as a manifestation of the respect borne towards him for his upright and honourable conduct in the capacity of corn-merchant.


Superior Calf - Heavyweight Pig!
From the Hull Packet 2nd March 1860

WINTRINGHAM
Mr Jackson, butcher, recently shewed
[sic] a very superior calf, weighing near 60 lbs. per quarter, fed by T. Taylor, Esq., of Bishopthorpe.  Mr Frank Pickersgill also slaughtered a fine pig, 15 months old, weighing over 40 stones.

[Editor's note: over 40 stones would make the pig more than a quarter of a ton!]


Local farmer captures woman escapee
From the Hull Packet 6th November 1863

The woman who made her escape out of Kirton gaol, was taken by John Sewell.  She had been in this and the surrounding villages three or four days, and had made a fire in his stack-yard where she had passed two nights.  She was given up to the police by him.


Giant Turnips!
From the Hull Packet 6th November 1863

On Saturday last, Mr Marshall took up two turnips which weighed 24 lbs and 22 lbs, measuring round 3 ft 4 in and 3 ft 2 in, sort, stone white, from seed raised by himself.


Farm Animals Sale
From the Hull Packet 3rd May 1880

WINTERINGHAM
MR. PERCIVAL SMITH will SELL by AUCTION, upon the Farm Premises of the late Mr. C. W. Burkill, Sluice-lane, near Winteringham, on THURSDAY, May 6th, 1880, the whole of the valuable Live and Dead FARMING STOCK, comprising 11 horses, 47 beasts, 300 sheep, 2 pork pigs, about 20 couples of fowls, and the usual complement of implements.  For further particulars, see bills and cards.  Luncheon, by ticket, at Ten o'clock; the Sale to commence immediately after.  Trains to stop at the Appleby Railway Station at convenient times for the Sale, where conveyances may be had.
Winterton, April 27th, 1880.


2s 6d a Day - Good or Bad?
From the Hull Packet 26th June 1885

WINTERTON
MR MARSHALL AND LABOURERS' WAGES. - To the Editor of the Hull and Lincolnshire Times. - Sir, - I seed in your paper Saturday afore last about a liberal at Winteringham on board the Paket saying 2s 6d a day was plenty for a labouring man to have and next Saturday I seed the man denied saying so.  Well I happened to be on Packet that day and heard Mr Marshall talking to some more folks.  He was a saying as how labouring men was never better of then they are now and 2s 6d a day was plenty for em to have.  I thought should like to Punch is head as I knew scores a chaps out a work.  A lot more heard him same as I.  excuse me sending this but I likes honesty and I likes me money on Saturday neet. - Yours, TRUTH. - South Ferriby 23rd June


Farm Accident
From the Hull Packet 9th November 1893

WINTERINGHAM
An accident of a serious nature befel a labourer named Thomas Dearing Monday week [31st August 1893], whilst engaged with the steam threshing machine, at Mr Tombleson's farm.  He was carrying the chaff away in a net, which somehow became entangled in a strap, and the result was that his arm was dragged in and severely bruised.


When the Co-op sold its Winteringham Herd, and then its Winteringham Farms

Scunthorpe Telegraph Monday 14th July 2008

PRIZE-WINNING HERD PUT UP FOR AUCTION BY CO-OP

A PRIZE-winning herd of cows was put up for auction by the Scunthorpe Co-operative Society 50 years ago.

The Scunthorpe Evening Telegraph on July 3, 1958, reported: "The society's famous Winteringham herd of pure-bred attested British Friesian cattle are to be auctioned on Monday and a week later the herd's home, Manor and Mere farms, Winteringham, will be similarly disposed of."The decision had been taken by the Society's board of directors.

"The herd, consisting of 100 head built up over a period of many years, has won awards at the London Dairy Show and numerous dairy shows throughout the country."

The report said the herd had first class high yielding animals, some of which had produced seven gallons of milk a day.

"The herd's annual overall milk average during the past seven years is claimed to be between 1,400 and 1,500 gallons per cow."

The report said the milk from the herd supplied the Co-op's dairy but the shortfall from the sale would be made up elsewhere.

"The Manor and Mere Farms have a total of 381 acres of arable land with Manor House and buildings, Glebe House and buildings and seven cottages, three in Winteringham and four at the Mere farmstead."

A report on July 8, 1958, noted the dairy herd was sold for 18,000 in four hours.

"About 800 people crammed the three 'grandstands' erected in the farmyard as the action began. More than half were still there when the sale closed." The secretary of the Scunthorpe Co-operative Society, Mr W Auty, said it was a very satisfactory result.

"The highest price of 660 guineas was paid for Winteringham Welcome Ruth, a six-year-old who had been awarded prizes at the 1955 London Dairy Show."

The sale of the farm buildings took place at the old Blue Bell Hotel in Scunthorpe High Street, on Monday, July 14. The following day's paper reported the two farms and other property had sold for 25,000.

Have you tried the other Winteringham Websites?
Winteringham, Parish Council (includes current news items, photographs, weather forecasts, calendar of events, etc etc) Don Burton World of Nature Photo Archive (modern photographs of the village), What the Papers have said about Winteringham (since July 2004), High Resolution Historical Photographs, Winteringham Film Archive, Winteringham Football Club, Winteringham Nature Site, Winteringham Recipes, Winteringham Sales, Winteringham Camera Club, Winteringham Village Hall, Winteringham Chapel

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