Boatbuilding at Winteringham

Winteringham Local History and Genealogy

Boatbuilding at Winteringham

Winteringham boatbuilders and trades 1851:

Name
George Waddingham
Charles Slingsby
Thomas Waddingham
Francis Bradley

Age
75
34
48
34

Position
Shipbuilder
Boat builder
Shipbuilder
Ship Carpenter

 

 

By 1901, these were the people who specifically were mentioned on the census in connection with boatbuilding:

Name
John Earl
Henry Waddingham
George G Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
John Routh
George W Sewell
Edwin A Bratton
Jackson Abbey
John S Waterlow

Age
41
52
20
18
51
23
30
45
15

Position
Shipwright
Ship builder
Apprentice Shipwright
Apprentice Shipwright
Ship builder
Ship carpenter
Labourer in Ship yard
Shipwright
Apprentice in Shipbuilding

 

 

In the Parish Registers, the following are mentioned in the baptisms, or marriages, or burials.  There are many men listed as carpenters, joiners, or labourers without specifying in which field of employment they worked, and some of these were definitely workers in the boatyard.  However, unless they were specifically given a job title whereby we can be sure they were boatyard workers, they have not been included here.

Name
Thomas Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
Isaac Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
George Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
George Waddingham
Isaac Waddingham
Isaac Waddingham
George Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
Isaac Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
Thomas Waddingham
William Waddingham
William Waddingham
George Waddingham
Francis Hookham
Thomas Waddingham
Samuel Ellis
Thomas Waddingham
Thomas Abbey
John Maniyan?
Francis Bell
Francis Bell
Francis Bell
George Ellis
John Earle
Francis Parrott
Jackson Abbey
John Skinner
Henry Waddingham
George Sewell

Year
1815
1816
1816
1817
1818
1818
1819
1819
1820
1820
1820
1821
1821
1821
1822
1822
1824
1825
1827
1828
1830
1841
1853
1872
1878
1879
1881
1883
1884
1885
1886
1893
1898
1900
1901

Position
Ship's carpenter
Shipwright
Shipwright
Shipwright
Shipwright
Shipwright
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Shipwright
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Shipwright
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship's carpenter
Ship joiner
Ship's carpenter
Shipwright

 

 

The boatyard on the Haven began as early as the middle of the eighteenth century.  It was founded by a Mr Waddingham, whose son George and grandson carried on the business and started as an apprentice respectfully.  The last of those was Thomas Waddingham, who then went to Barton to start up his own boatbuilding business.  Thomas was born on November 2nd 1801 to the aforementioned George, and Lucy (nee Wressell).

The Winteringham yard was then continued by Charles Slingsby and William Bell, and that firm was eventually superseded by Messrs Routh and Waddingham.  Routh and Waddingham ceased making boats in 1920, but boats were still being repaired at the yard until the outbreak of World War II, under the name of Cooper and Son.  Routh and Waddingham advertised the boatyard for sale in April 1920 “by private treaty.

The shipyard (boatyard as sometimes called) stood on about 2 acres of land with a riverside frontage of 450 feet.  The dry dock (of the floating variety) was 76 feet by 25 feet.

One boat maintained and repaired at Winteringham by Routh and Waddingham was the Charlotte Kilner, known to have been in the yard in 1907, and again in 1914.

Fishing trawlers, keels, sea-going ketches, shrimping smacks, lighters, sloops and steam drifters were all produced at Winteringham, and during the Great War a French canal barge!  (There were 590 barges used for everything from crossing the Channel, to hospital barges, barges for carrying water, pumping water, and for carrying goods whose delivery time was not urgent).

During the Great War a steam drifter was built - intended for minesweeping duties while the conflict continued, and a sister ship started.  Approximately 20 village men were employed at the yard at the time.

We know the names of some of the boats built in Winteringham, and all were romantic sounding.  Here’s the list as we know it:

 

Built by

Name

Type

Year built

Official Number

 

Owners

Registered Port

 

Economy

Sloop

1800

 

round stern, 55ft-11 x 13ft-11 x 4ft-11.

1808: Benjamin Mackrill, Barton, brickmaker; reregistered 1813 William Mackrill, Barton, Brickmaker; John Dickenson, master

 

 

Hope

Sloop

1810

 

56ft-2 x 13ft-10

Benjamin Mackrill Barton, stonemason; Nick Hewart, master

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exertion

Sloop

1810

13885

62 tons

Robert Rose, Winteringham

Hull

 

Industry

Sloop

1836

4961

47 tons

S Blackburn, Wyton Dock

Hull

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Fitch, Straddlethorp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J. Kitson, Knottingley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Waddingham

Mary Catherine

Sloop

1840

12713

52 tons

Matthew Towning, Knottingley

Goole

George Waddingham

William & Lucy

Sloop

1842

28212

53 tons

John Shaw, Floxfleet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas & William Hebblewhite, New Village

Hull

 

 

 

 

 

 

1881 Census at Kings Lynn: James DUDDING/U/42/Master (Newport Eastrington, Yorks) with
Robert WILDS/U/24/Mate (St Margaret Parish Lynn, Norfolk)
William EASTOL/O/15/Boy (Wisbech, Cambs)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Waddingham

Friends

Schooner

1838

4961

 

There were a number of boats on the Humber going by the name of Friends, but this MAY have been the boat owned by Robert Rose in 1869 which ran aground outside of Lowestoft Harbour, and was the subject of a dispute with the boatyard that subsequently repaired her.  She was sloop rigged, and had earlier been owned for five or six years by Jonas Drewry, who Robert Rose engaged as her skipper after he bought her.  These details were correct in the perod 1869-1871.  Previously owned by William Waddingham of Winteringham, and Robert Lawty, Hull

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Charles Oliver

Trawler

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Charles Oscar6

Fishing Smack

 

 

 

Launched on Saturday 24th November, 1877, by Mrs Waddingham, in the presence of “a large concourse of people.”  The Charles Oscar was the first fishing smack built at Winteringham.  She was owned by C Crowther, ships chandlers, of Grimsby, and had a beam of 20 feet.  See below for her heroic rescue fo a Dutch crew (1880) and her own demise on a reef (1884).

Please note that this may be the ship named as Charles Oliver above, whose name was gleaned from the pages of the 1933 WEA group publication.  The name “Charles Oscar” is from a report in the Hull Packet of 30th November 1877.

 

Routh & Waddingham

Northern Lights

Trawler

1879

 

 

Launched mid-May 1879 in front of an estimated 400-500 spectators.  Christened by Mr Westcott of Grimsby, with the name of Nord Lyset (Northern Lights).  20’ by 81’, 78 tons, designed by her owner Hans Mohr of Thorshaven, for the cod fishery off the Faroe Islands.

 

Routh & Waddingham

Coranilla 4

Trawler

1882

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Mary Ann 1

Trawler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Nemo

Keel

1884

 

 

Built 1884, 49 tons, registered Hull, official number 91391.

 

Routh & Waddingham

Reliance

Keel

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Amity

Keel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Aimwell5

Sea-going Ketch

1883

 

 

Official number 88136; A vessel named Aimwell, which we believe to be the one built at Winteringham, sank on 17th October 1919.  She had been heading to Goole from Newcastle with a cargo of sulphur ore, and was spotted by the Clara, a trading steamer on passage from Antwerp to Goole.  The Clara found no-one on board, and the Aimwell taking in water.  The Clara tried to tow the Aimwell, but after a short while, the Aimwell keeled over and sank, and the heavy rope used for the towing had to be cut.

 

 

 

(Billy Boy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

George & Frances 2

Shrimping smack

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Nimrod

Shrimping smack

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Reliance 3

Shrimping smack

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Spring

Sloop

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Thistle

Sloop

 

 

 

Earle's Cement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

The Swell

Steam Drifter

1917*

146868

97 tons

 

 

Routh & Waddingham

Tiderace

Steam Drifter

Cancelled 1919

 

 

Never built, due to end of Great War

 

The above list includes information from Winteringham WEA Group 1933, and Peter, the webmaster, at www.humberpacketboats.co.uk

Aimwell was 25m x 5.19m and two-masted.

Aimwell was launched 23rd July 1883, and named by Miss Lily Barraclough of Barton on Humber, built for Messrs R and J Barraclough of Barton.  Schooner rigged, and largest built at Winteringham at the time at 130 tons “burthen.”

Notes:

1: There was a boat called Mary Ann registered at Grimsby with number GY 1258 from 1903-1908.  It is uncertain if this was the Winteringham boat.
2: There was a boat called George and Frances registered at Grimsby with number GY 490 from 1915-38.  It is uncertain if this was the Winteringham boat.
3: There was a boat called Reliance registered at Grimsby with number GY 1282 from 1903-11.  It is uncertain if this was the Winteringham boat.
4. The Routh’s had a daughter in 1888 or 1889, who had a similar name.  There are several spellings.  The 1891 census spells her name as Coranilla, but Judith Chant gives the spelling “Coronella.”  With this spelling comes the names of several sail trawlers of exactly this name - none being ‘our’ trawler, unfortunately! 
5: There were other boats built elsewhere going by the name of Aimwell.  The origin of the name may be the racehorse which won the Epsom Derby on 5th May 1785.
6: The Charles Oscar was involved in an heroic rescue in the North Sea, following a great gale in November 1880.  She took on board the crew of the Dutch schooner Elizabeth Lorlina, and returned them to Grimsby.  The Elizabeth Lorlina was on the point of sinking when the Charles Oscar rescued her Captain - called Boy - his two sons, and mate.  A fifth crew member had been washed overboard and lost during the storm.  Half a dozen smacks from Grimsby were overdue following the gale, and causing considerable anxiety for their safe return.  The Charles Oscar was abandoned and broke up in May 1884, whilst fishing.  She struck on the Horn Reefs, Jutland, whilst fishing, and the Board of Trade Inquiry found that her captain was below decks resting, whilst leaving one of her crew on deck.  Whilst this was “universal practice” in the fishing community, the Inquiry found that the captain took no account of the tide and other conditions that should have had his personal supervision, and he had his certificate suspended for three calendar months.

 

 

Swell at Winteringham BoatyardRight: The Swell at Winteringham

She was launched in 1919, under the official number 146868, (Admiralty number 4186) and completed on 23rd June 1920 as a fishing vessel.  She was 97 gross tons, 39 tons net, 86 feet long, 19 feet 7 inches in beam, and 10 foot depth.  Official Number: 146868.  Her engine was a three-cylinder made by Elliott & Garrood Ltd, of Beccles, who specialised in marine engines.

Later that year, on 14th December she was transferred to the Fishery Board for Scotland for disposal, and bought on 3rd February 1922, by the Grimsby Seine Net Co Ltd, and converted to a seine netter. 

She fished under the number GY 138 and renamed the Silvernight.  She is listed on the Fleetwood Online Archive of Trawlers, here, and the Bosun’s Watch site, here .

On 3rd June 1932, she was sold on again, this time to Harry Franklin Ltd, Grimsby, and R Cowie, Cleethorpes.  She was fishing from Fleetwood from 1940-1945, and sold again to Harry Franklin in 1948.  In 1955, she was sold for breaking up.

The sister-ship of Swell to be built by Routh and Waddingham was to receive the name Tiderace, but was cancelled in 1919 as the Great War had ended.

For a larger version of this photograph, please click here

Admiralty Steam Drifters were based on “Ocean Reward” a steam drifter built by Alexander Hall of Aberdeen in 1912.  They were used as moorings for barrage balloons, boom defence, minesweeping, convoy escorts and for anti-submarine patrols.  We don’t know which of these duties “Swell” or “Tiderace” were intended for, though in the event Swell was built too late for the war and Tiderace cancelled, so we will never know.

 

Routh and Waddingham's Boatyard, WinteringhamLeft:

The Boatyard at Winteringham Haven in its heyday

 

Photograph reproduced by kind permission of North Lincolnshire Council Image Archive

The archive contains this and many more photographs of Winteringham.  Click the photograph to go to the NLC Archive.


(From the Hull Packet of 30th November 1877)
WINTERINGHAM
REVIVAL OF WOODEN SHIPBUILDING.-
The great development of the fishing trade at Hull and Grimsby has caused a considerable revival of wooden shipbuilding on the Humber, in fact has in many places created a new industry altogether - that of smack building.  The old established shipyard here, which lately came into the hands of the enterprising firm of Routh and Waddingham, is an instance of this.  The first smack ever built at this place was launched on Saturday last in the presence of a large concourse of people.  She was christened the "Charles Oscar" by Mrs. Waddingham, wife of one of the firm, is a fine smart vessel of 20 feet beam, and owned by Mr. C. Crowther, ship chandler, of Grimsby.  The launch was in every way a complete success.  The yard is now, with its large dry dock, possession of steam-saw, &c., one of the most complete and efficient establishments on the banks of the Humber.

(From the Hull Packet of 29th April 1881)
WINTERINGHAM
WRECKAGE -
The keel Mary was recovered from the Humber last week, and brought to Messrs Routh and Waddingham's dry dock for repairs.


(From the Hull Packet of 16th June 1882)
WINTERINGHAM
SHIPBUILDING -
Messrs Routh and Waddingham's yard here, now presents a busy aspect; three new vessels are being built, one of considerable size.  The dry dock too is rarely empty.  Although this trade has so nearly died out at many places on the river , it is steadily progressing at this place.


(On 13th October 1882, the following advertisement appeared in the Hull Packet)
WINTERINGHAM.
A NEW FISHING SMACK. -
Messrs Routh and Waddingham have just completed a fishing-smack for Messrs Crouther and Son, smackowners, of Grimsby, which is considered by judges to be a splendid model of that class of vessel.  It is arranged for the launch to take place on Saturday, the 14th inst., at 8 a.m., weather and tide permitting, when no doubt a considerable number of visitors will be present.

 

“Thistle” - built by Routh and Waddingham, modelled by Mr A Waddingham

Model of Routh and Waddingham's "Thistle"  Winteringham
Model of Routh and Waddingham's "Thistle", Winteringham

 

This model of the “Thistle” was built by Mr A Waddingham, who used the same materials as were used to build the original.  Martin Breeton, who currently owns the model, was told that this was the last barge built at the Winteringham Yard.

Our thanks to Martin, and to Keith Naylor who photographed the Thistle.

There is a photograph of the Thistle entering the River Hull in “the 1910s.”  She was owned by Earles’ Cement Company, and employed to bring clay from west of Barrow-on-Humber across the Humber to Earles’ Cement works 1 miles up the River Hull.  The photograph can be seen on page 64 of “Shipping on the Humber - The South Bank” by Mike Taylor, ISBN 0-7524-2780-5, published by Tempus Publishing Ltd, The Mill, Brimscombe Port, Stroud, GL5 2QG.

Postcard of Haven - 1200 dpi 800w

 

Boatyard sale - enhanced 525w

When the Boatyard was sold on behalf of Routh and Waddingham, the above notice was placed by Fawley, Judge and Easton of Hull.

 

 

 

 

Further research

Aimwell
There is a plan of this boat in: Barges, by John Leather, published by Adlard Coles Nautical, ISBN 0229115942 
Note: Although this book is out of print, and unavailable as a new purchase, it may be available from the Library Service, and several copies are usually available as secondhand purchases.

There is a model of the Aimwell in the Hull Maritime Museum, on the first floor.

 

 

 

Have you tried the other Winteringham Websites?
Winteringham, Parish Council (includes current news items, photographs, weather forecasts, calendar of events, etc etc) Don Burton World of NaturePhoto Archive (modern photographs of the village), What the Papers have said about Winteringham (since July 2004), High Resolution Historical Photographs, Winteringham Film Archive, Winteringham Football Club, Winteringham Nature Site, Winteringham Recipes, Winteringham Sales, Winteringham Camera Club, Winteringham Village Hall, Winteringham Chapel

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