Winteringham Buildings & Materials

Winteringham Local History and Genealogy

See also the renovation of Walnut Farm Cottage:

Bricks and Mortar ...

Old shops, West End, WinteringhamWinteringham’s earliest houses were built of the local stone, and these two shops in West End are examples of this. 

But bricks and tiles were also manufactured in the village for a very long time, and evidence such as the clay pits in the aptly named ‘Old Brick Fields’ showed they had been used before the middle of the 19th century. 

There were three brickworks in the village by the latter part of the nineteenth century - Suttons, Slaters and one half a mile west of Ferriby Sluice - but this last one was washed away, together with two cottages belonging to it, by the Humber.

In White’s 1842 Directory, the William Marshall is listed not just as the village butcher, but also the brickmaker too.  He sold his brick-making business in 1857, and we assume that he then concentrated on butchery.

George Button, and then his son Harold were brickmakers too, but after they finished, that was the end of brick manufacture in Winteringham.

Cement Factory, Winteringham, old factoryIt was not, though, the end of Winteringham clay as a building material.  In 1938, Eastwoods opened their cement factory, utilising the chalk from the hill above South Ferriby which was transported to the works by overhead cableway, and clay from Cement factory aerial ropeway at South FerribyWinteringham Ings where the plant was built.  The factory chimney, at 232 feet could be seen for many miles distant.  The cement was named “Eastwoods Humber Cement” and was manufactured using a ‘wet’ process.  Eastwoods owned three other cement factories - Barrington in Cambridgeshire, Chinnor in Oxfordshire and Lewes in Sussex, plus two subsidiaries overseas, a brick-making business and a builders merchants’. 

There was a narrow-gauge railway running out into the clay fields, which was powered by diesel locomotives, and fed by dredgers.  Cement factory at Winteringham - new building

In 1967, after the factory had been acquired by Rugby Portland Cement, the new plant was built, changing over to a dry process, and fed with chalk by a less-romantic, though doubtless more efficient conveyor belt

 

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Ferriby Cement Works 800w 15032013

Photo provided by Lorna Tomlinson, and scanned by Ken Jacobs

Cement Factory - lorry line up 525w

26th June 1957, and the lorries are lined up, and the flags flying, for the Queen passing by, between Scunthorpe and Grimsby

Photo from Leonard Hunsley, and scanned by Sandra Clayton

Cement Factory - lorry School Road 300w

Leonard Hunsely’s impressive lorry in School Road, outside “Marmion.”

Photo from Leonard Hunsley, and scanned by Sandra Clayton

Cement Factory - Wage packet 350w

Leonard Hunsleys pay packet from 2nd December 1957.  The calculations for the wages are just below the date.  This is 64 hours at 4s 2d per hour, with 64 hours at 2d an hour, to arrive at 14 .. 0s .. 7d for the week.

Photo from Leonard Hunsley, and scanned by Sandra Clayton

Further Research: For further research about cement, click here for the Cemex website.

Bye Laws and Thatch

 

Oldest Cottage in Winteringham (Silver Street)

 

Above: Thought to be the oldest house in the village, pictured in September 1967, but since that time, Walnut Farm Cottage has now been dated at approximately 600 years old! (See below)

Below: detail from the photograph of the Rose Queen procession, c.1954

Old Cottage West End Winteringham

 

Despite losing the house above in the black and white photograph, Winteringham had, and still has some very old houses.

The plaque above the door is not readable even in the original photograph, but it stated that the cottage was built in 1677.

The house in the colour photograph was built five years earlier.

Both houses would originally have been thatched.  To help prevent the thatch catching fire, there were a number of bye-laws in force at the time.  These included the requirement that each house had to have a thatch hook - for tearing off any thatch that caught light; no cooking was to be carried out after 9 o’clock at night; and there was to be no smoking in the streets ... a law which put Winteringham 350 years ahead of New York!

Restoration of Walnut Farm Cottage

In 2006-7 the renovation of the iconic building on Silver Street, Walnut Cottage, was begun, and Ken Jacobs took a unique series of photographs detailing the stages both inside and outside the building.  It had not been lived in for more than 50 years by the time renovation was begun.  To see these photographs, click one of the areas below:

Walnut Farm - originalOutside views 

Inside Views Inside views

Detail photos  Detail photos  

Walnut CottageProgress February 2007

Boot from the ChimneyAugust 2007- the boot

Walnut Farm Cottage wellOctober 2007 - the well

 

Ferry Lane Barn, shortly before demolition
Ferry Lane Barn

Click here to see detailed photos of the barn - and a find of old boots!

Click here to see detailed photos of the barn’s demolition

 

Great Grandad working at ferriby Cliff - 150w

South Ferriby Cliff Quarry

Historic Auctions of Village Property

Sometimes the details in auction adverts can give us a good idea of houses, property, and furniture in times gone by.  Here’s a few...  There are more on the Burkill pages here.


From the Hull Packet of 6th August 1852
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, by MESSRS. MORLEY and SON, at the Bay Horse Inn, in Winteringham, in the County of Lincoln on SATURDAY, the 28th August, 1852, at Four o'Clock in the Afternoon, in the following Lots, and subject to such Conditions of Sale as shall be then and there produced, all that the REMAINDER or REVERSION EXPECTANT, on the decease of a Lady aged 85 Years, of and in -
LOT 1.- All that MESSUAGE or DWELLING HOUSE, with the Yard, Garden, Orchard, and Outbuildings thereto adjoining and belonging, situate in the Town Street in Winteringham aforesaid, in the occupation of Mrs. Ann Tomlinson; bounded by Land of John Westoby on the East, Lands of Lord Carrington and Mrs. Clarke on the West, on other Lands of Lord Carrington on the North, and on the Town Street aforesaid on the South.
LOT 2.- And of and in all that ALLOTMENT or Parcel of LAND, lying in the Marsh of Winteringham aforesaid, containing 5A. 0R. 1P. (be the same more or less), in the occupation of Mr. James Sewell; bounded by Land of Mrs. Barratt on the South, Lands of Mr. Hardy Barratt on the North, Lands of Mr. William Marshall on the East, and an Occupation Road on the West.
The above Premises are respectively Copyhold of the Manor of Winteringham.- Fine small and certain.
The respective Tenants will shew [sic] the Premises, and further Particulars may be known on application to
Messrs. LEVETT & CHAMPNEY, Solicitors.
Hull, 4th August, 1852.

__________________________________________________________

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, by MESSRS. MORLEY and SON, at the Bay Horse Inn, in Winteringham, in the County of Lincoln on SATURDAY, the 28th Day of August, 1852, at Four o'Clock in the Afternoon, in the following Lots, and subject to such Conditions of Sale as shall be then and there produced, all that the REMAINDER or REVERSION EXPECTANT, on the decease of a Lady aged 85 Years, of and in -
LOT 1.- All those TWO COTTAGES or DWELLING HOUSES, with Gardens, Stable, and Outbuildings thereto belonging, situate in Winteringham aforesaid, in the respective occupations of Edward Clarvis and John Atkinson; bounded by Land of John Scarbrough on the East, Land of Mrs. Atkinson on the West, Silver street on the North, and Lands of Lord Carrington on the South.
LOT 2.- And of and in all that Allotment or Parcel of LAND, lying in the Marsh of Winteringham aforesaid, containing 5A. 0R. 10P. (be the same more or less), in the occupation of Mr. Robert Snowden; bounded by Land of Lord Carrington on the East, Land of Samuel Brooks on the West, the Marsh Drain on the North, and Land of the Rev. T.F.R. Reade [sic] on the South.
The above Premises are respectively Copyhold of the Manor of Winteringham.- Fine small and certain.
The respective Tenants will show [sic] the Premises; and further Particulars may be known on application to
Messrs. LEVETT & CHAMPNEY, Solicitors.
Hull, 4th August, 1852.

Earthquake and High Winds Damage Buildings!


From the Hull Packet 2nd March 1860
WINTRINGHAM
The high wind on Monday [27th February 1860] dislodged many tiles from the housetops, making it dangerous to persons passing along the streets.  A great many slates were also blown off the church.


From the Hull Packet 26th June 1885
WINTRINGHAM
The earthquake vibration last week was distinctly felt in three or four houses in this village.  In one the movement was very obvious.  It was something like that occasioned by the passing of a heavy waggon.

 

 

 

Have you tried the other Winteringham Websites?
Winteringham, Parish Council (includes current news items, photographs, weather forecasts, calendar of events, etc etc) Don Burton World of Nature Photo Archive (modern photographs of the village), What the Papers have said about Winteringham (since July 2004), High Resolution Historical Photographs, Winteringham Film Archive, Winteringham Football Club, Winteringham Nature Site, Winteringham Recipes, Winteringham Sales, Winteringham Camera Club, Winteringham Village Hall, Winteringham Chapel

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